community

Community Partnerships

ATW is committed to building dynamic community partnerships in innovative ways; continuously promoting and representing the aviation industry through related aviation activities with groups and organizations in need.

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ATW-MakeAWish-WebImageWith more than 77% of wishes involving air travel, ATW is proud to be one of the many venues that Make-A-Wish uses to grant wishes to families in the community.  ATW welcomes Make-A-Wish families to our airport by helping to create a memorable airport experience for both the child and family.  ATW assists the families from the check-in process, to getting through security and stays with the families until they board the airplane.

Click here for more Information about Make A Wish.


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ATW is honor to be a partner of Old Glory Honor Flight by assisting them in transporting local WWII & Korean War veterans to see their memorials in Washington D.C.

Since Old Glory Honor Flight’s first mission in 2009. ATW has worked alongside them to achieve their mission of giving the veterans a memorable tour of honor.  ATW is proud to have assisted Old Glory Honor Flight in accomplishing 38 missions so far.

To learn more about Old Glory and to see their schedule of events please visit their website at www.oldgloryhonorflight.org.clyde-patzke

“The reception back in Appleton was so moving for me.”
– Clyde Patzke, Airforce 1949-51
Communications and switchboard operator.
Reserves until 1957

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ATW teams up with Wings For All and Wings for Autism to provide the experience of going to an airport, checking in at the airline counter, going through security, boarding the plane, and collecting baggage at the conclusion of a trip. This can be a helpful process for children with Autism to help reduce stress and anxiety by familiarizing them with the various steps taken when flying.

View Our Airport Social Story:

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“We have twins on the spectrum and both completely opposite. Our daughter can’t handle too much sensory input whereas our son needs a lot of sensory input. This event really gave us an idea on how both children would respond to the process of air travel. It also gave our kids a mental picture of what to expect with air travel…” – Jacqueline Braemer