Notice of Passenger Facility Charge

Appleton International Airport
Passenger Facility Charge
Notification and Opportunity for Public Comment

Outagamie County, Wisconsin is providing an opportunity for public comment until November 17, 2017 related to our proposed new Impose and Use Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) Application #9 for the Appleton International Airport. This written notice is provided in accordance with requirements contained in Federal Aviation Regulation 49 CFR Part 158.24 Passenger Facility Charge.

Outagamie County plans to continue the maximum PFC allowable of $4.50 per enplaned passenger. We anticipate collection to begin on January 1, 2023, with a total revenue impact of $15,163,842. The PFC expiration date for the fifteen projects described below is estimated to be July 1, 2037. Future PFC projects will likely extend the expiration date.

PFC Charge Level

  • PFC charge level for PFC #9 $4.50
  • Total PFC Revenue to be collected for PFC #9 $15,163,842

PFC Effective Date and Expiration Date

  • Proposed charge effective date: January 1, 2023
  • Estimate charge expiration date: July 1, 2037

Instructions for Providing Comments
Comments or a request for more detailed project descriptions should be sent to the following:

Mr. Abram Weber, Airport Director
Appleton International Airport
W6390 Challenger Drive, Suite 201
Appleton, WI 54914
[email protected]

Project 09-001 Conduct Sustainable Master Plan

This project included the development of an Airport Master Plan. The master plan provides the Airport with a comprehensive overview of the Airport’s needs over the next twenty years, including a preferred development plan, rough order of magnitude of costs for the development, methods of financing, and a plan of action for implementation of improvements. The project included traditional master plan elements including airport layout plan, airfield, terminal and land use recommendations, airport access, and support facilities, in accordance with FAA Advisory Circular 150/5070-6A, Airport Master Plans.

Additionally, in 2010 the airport was selected by the FAA as one of ten airports in the country to complete an airport sustainability master plan. Therefore, the scope of the traditional plan was expanded to include a sustainability baseline assessment, development of sustainability goals and objectives, and the identification and evaluation of sustainability initiatives. It also included the development of sustainability performance targets and an implementation plan and monitoring performance program.

The Airport’s last comprehensive Master Plan was completed in March 2003. A new Master Plan was necessary to update the Airport’s aviation forecasts and facilities requirements for the planning period, and to consider the long-term sustainability of the Airport. This Master Plan’s Sustainable initiatives focus on reducing the energy use of Airport-owned buildings through a combination of new construction, energy efficient retrofits and the use of renewable energy sources.

The total cost of this project was $592,641. The FAA provided funding under AIP federal grants #37 and #41 in the amount of $563,009. The State of Wisconsin funded $14,816. PFCs are requested to provide the remaining local match of $14,816. This project started in October 2009 and was completed in September 2012.

Project 09-002 – Install Runway Guard Lights and Airfield Signs

This project included the replacement of airfield guidance signs and the installation of runway guard lights and airfield pavement condition sensors.

The replacement of the airfield guidance signage was necessary to address changes to taxiway designations. Additional signage was provided to eliminate confusion. The installation of guard lights at all runway crossing points increased safety to prevent runway incursions by further defining runway entrances. The runway sensors aid airport maintenance activities during cold weather events and are used in calculating braking distance for incoming aircraft. This project was identified as an action item by the local Runway Safety Action Team (RSAT).

The total cost of this project was $1,017,521. The FAA has provided funding under AIP federal grant #42 in the amount of $966,645. The State of Wisconsin funded $25,438. PFCs are requested to provide the remaining local match of $25,438. This project started in April 2011 and was completed in December 2011.

Project 09-003 – Rehabilitate Runway 12/30

This project included the design and construction necessary to replace failed pavement panels on Runway 12/30 (formerly Runway 11/29). The project included the demolition and removal of the existing concrete panels and base material. New base material and new 13” PCC was placed. Approximately 16,637 square yards of pavement was replaced. The project included the placement of new pavement markings.

Sections of Runway 12/30 were at the end of their useful life, with PCI valued as low as 54. This runway was paved in 1989 with a 13” aggregate base and 13” PCC. The pavement’s distresses included longitudinal cracking, faulting, and shattered slabs. The runway is approximately 6,500’ long by 150’ wide.

The total cost of this project was $2,316,827. The FAA has provided funding under AIP federal grants #43 and #45 in the amount of $2,089,875. The State of Wisconsin funded $113,476. PFCs are requested to provide the local match of $113,476. This project started in July 2012 and was completed in August 2013.

Project 09-004 – Rehabilitate Taxiway B North

This project included the design and construction necessary to replace failed pavement panels on Taxiway B North. The project includes the demolition and removal of the existing concrete panels and base material. New base material and new 10” PCC was placed. Approximately 12,328 square yards of pavement was replaced. The project included the placement of new pavement markings.

The north section of Taxiway B (between B4 and B5) was at the end of its useful life, with PCI valued at 51. This section of the taxiway was paved in 1969 with an 8” aggregate base and 10” PCC. Most of the pavement’s distress were attributed to aging of the pavement and durability cracking. The failing section measured approximately 1,365’ long by 75’ wide plus returns at three intersections.

The total cost of this project was $1,348,592. The FAA provided funding under AIP federal grant #44 in the amount of $1,213,732. The State of Wisconsin funded $67,430. PFCs are requested to provide the local match of $67,430. This project started in June 2012 and was completed in September 2012.

Project 09-005 – Extend Taxiway N

This project included the design and construction of an extension to Taxiway N. The extension measured approximately 2,800’ long by 75’ wide and was constructed of a 9” aggregate base and 12” of PCC. The project included the necessary site preparation, drainage, taxiway edge lighting and pavement markings. This project was designed in accordance with Advisory Circular 150/5300-13A, Airport Design.

This project was necessary to connect Taxiway B with the Runway 30 (previously Runway 29) threshold. The completion of this action item should result in a marked decrease in runway incursions because traffic will no longer have to use Taxiway N3 (previously Taxiway L) to cross an active runway for departures on Runway 30 or arrivals on Runway 12 (previously Runway 11). This project was identified as an action item by the local Runway Safety Action Team (RSAT).

The total cost of this project was $2,272,210. The FAA has provided funding under AIP federal grant #45 in the amount of $2,044,988. The State of Wisconsin funded $113,611. PFCs are requested to provide the local match of $113,611. This project started in July 2012 and was completed in August 2013.

Project 09-006 – Construct Perimeter Road

This project included the design and construction to complete the perimeter road from the south side to the southeast side of the Airport. Specifically, it provided grading and paving of the portion of perimeter road that was gapped in previous projects (specifically the area on the south side of the airport), and paving for the perimeter road on the west and the southeast sides of the airport (which previously existed as a gravel surfaced roadbed).

This project resulted in improved vehicle access around the entire airport, and a marked decrease in the use of runways and taxiways by ground vehicles to access portions of the airfield. This project was identified as an action item by the local Runway Safety Action Team (RSAT).

The total cost of this project was $368,420. The FAA provided funding under AIP federal grant #45 in the amount of $331,578. The State of Wisconsin funded $18,421. PFCs are requested to provide the local match of $18,421. This project started in July 2012 and was completed in January 2013.

Project 09-007 – Expand Snow Removal Equipment (SRE) Building

This project included the expansion of the Snow Removal Equipment building by 17,800 square feet through expansion to the existing SRE/maintenance facility to the northwest. The project included additional asphalt apron expansion to allow for vehicle maneuvering and potential outdoor storage. The cost of the project also included the environmental assessment which was required in preparation for the project.

The existing snow removal equipment (SRE) storage building was constructed in 1996. Expansion to the existing building was necessary to accommodate additional equipment storage needs as the airport continues to grow and add priority pavement.

The total cost of this project was $2,181,554. The FAA has provided funding under AIP federal grants #49 and #50 in the amount of $1,963,398. The State of Wisconsin funded $109,078. PFCs are requested to provide the local match of $109,078. This project was started in July 2016 and was completed in April 2017.

Project 09-008 – Install Solar Energy Equipment

This project includes the design and construction of Phase II and Phase III of the Airport’s multi-phased solar project. Phase II includes the construction of two structures and 441 solar panels, supplying solar energy into a 115W system. Phase III includes the construction of one structure and 221 solar panels, supplying solar energy into a 115KW system.

In 2010 the airport was selected by the FAA as one of ten airports in the country to complete a Sustainable Airport Master Plan. Under the 2012 Sustainable Airport Master Plan, goals were set to seek 70% energy consumption reduction by the year 2030. Part of the sustainably efforts were to seek alternative energy measures which include solar energy. These solar projects adhere to criteria for an energy efficiency improvement cost to be allowable under AIP guidance. A glare analysis was completed in June 2016 for the proposed expansion.

The total cost of this project is estimated to be $1,627,132. The FAA has provided funding under AIP federal grant #51 in the amount of $549,000 and AIP grant #54 in the amount of $562,500. The State of Wisconsin is anticipated to provide total funding of $257,816 which represents one half of the AIP local match of $61,750 as well as $196,066 for eligible costs in excess of AIP funds available. PFCs are requested to provide the local match of $61,750 as well as $196,066 for eligible costs in excess of AIP funds available. Total PFCs requested is $257,816. This project started in June 2017 and will be completed in September 2018.

Project 09-009 – Expand and Rehabilitate Terminal Building

This project includes the design and construction efforts toward the expansion and rehabilitation of the passenger terminal building. This includes various areas of the terminal building, as described below.

The security screening checkpoint will be expanded from two passenger screening lanes to three.
This effort will require the expansion of the terminal building by approximately 500 square feet to the south. This will shift the exit lane to the south and allow for the widening of the checkpoint. This work will include the necessary demolition, new construction, structural work, electrical, plumbing, fire suppression and HVAC valves and controls. The project includes the installation of exit lane monitoring technology to ensure individuals do not attempt to enter the post security side of the terminal through the exit lane. This project does not include any security screening equipment.

The existing retail and concession spaces to the south of the checkpoint and exit lane will be partially removed and relocated to the west. This relocation will also provide for the widening of the space necessary for the exit lane which has been shifted to the south and widened as well as the widening of the security checkpoint. This relocation will also expand the circulation space in the public lobby of the terminal, providing improved circulation between ticketing, the checkpoint, the exit lane and the path to baggage claim.

The project also includes the rehabilitation of the public restrooms. The rehabilitation will include the removal and replacement of the restroom fixtures and finishes including water closets, urinals, lavatory sinks, floor drains, new flooring, painting and ceilings. The project also includes the replacement of the ceiling and lighting above the queuing and waiting areas in front of the ticket counters.

Other elements of this project also include the construction of a Mother’s room, an airline baggage office and relocated TSA offices. The cost of the Mother’s room is included in the AIP/PFC eligible costs. The costs of the baggage office and TSA offices will be funded with local funds.

This project is necessary to address security screening and circulation capacity constraints at ATW. ATW has experienced positive passenger growth from 227,038 enplanements in 2012 to 270,633 in 2016. With the growth in service by Allegiant Air, the use of larger aircraft by Delta and United, and the addition of service by American Airlines, the Airport has estimated 2018 enplanements to exceed 300,000 passengers. This growth in passengers has put a strain on the capacity of the screening checkpoint as well as the public circulation space on the pre-security side of the terminal building.

The total cost of this project is estimated to be $5,508,000. The FAA has provided funding under AIP federal grants #52 ad #53 in the amount of $4,264,629. The State of Wisconsin is anticipated to fund $236,924. PFCs are requested to provide the local match of $236,924 plus an additional $116,875 for eligible costs in excess of available AIP funds. Total PFCs requested is $353,799. Local funds are estimated to be $652,648. This project is estimated to start in September 2017 and be completed in September 2018.

Project 09-010 – Acquire Passenger Loading Bridges

This project includes the design, acquisition and installation of five (5) new passenger loading bridges at the Appleton International Airport serving Gates 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8. The loading bridges will include luggage devices, ground power units and pre-conditioned air units. These passenger loading bridges will be large enough to accommodate aircraft with door sill heights in excess of 11 feet. The project includes the necessary ramp modifications to accommodate the installation of the new bridges and associated electrical work.

The five passenger loading bridges being purchased will replace five passenger loading bridges which were installed at Appleton International Airport (ATW) in 2001 as part of the terminal expansion project. They were manufactured by DEW Inc which went out of business in 2012 with its assets being acquired by AmeriBridge, Inc. The parts network for the DEW bridges is supported through AmeriBridge, but many parts are hard to acquire. Many times, ATW has had to get parts manufactured from local sources such as axles. If parts are available, there are times that a premium is paid as there are not many available in the network. For example, a gearbox on Boarding Bridge 4 recently experienced a catastrophic failure. While AmeriBridge did have the gearbox assembly, the Airport was told that it was the last remaining gearbox in the United States.

Recently, the Passenger Loading Bridge at Gate 5 had a complete failure of the gantry motors which raise and lower the bridge. The failures of the motors caused an electrical spike in the system and subsequently caused the PLC (power logic control) to fail. The motors were sent out to be rebuilt and a new PLC unit was purchased and had to be re-programmed. Throughout the ten (10) day downtime, the Airport coordinated with the airlines on an operational plan which required both gate changes and aircraft fleet mix changes by multiple air carriers to accommodate flights due to the loss of functionality of the gate. Because the bridge was not operational, the brakes had to be manually released to allow it to be pushed out the way to allow operations in the ramp area while it was out of service. The downtime occurred during EAA AirVenture which is typically a peak time for the Airport with upgraded flights for increased passenger volume to the area for the event.

Earlier this year, the automatic leveler on the Passenger Loading Bridge at Gate 8 failed allowing the loading bridge to make contact with the aircraft door. The air carrier required a pressurization test of the aircraft prior to operation. This test led to the delay and ultimate cancellation of the flight. While ultimately it was determined the aircraft did not sustain any damage, the failure of the bridge resulted in disruption to passengers and air carrier operations.

In addition to these examples, other recent bridge failures include inoperative interior lighting and strobe/safety lighting, failed GPU cooling fan, doors not securing properly, and a variety of other electrical related problems. Given that the bridges are all the same vintage, if one part fails on a bridge, there is the potential for the others to follow that pattern.
There are additional functionality issues that either due to cost and availability of parts have not been corrected. One example is the canopy lift motors that are faulty and corroded which are causing the canopies to not function correctly. The airlines have compensated with not having this feature available by using a bridge ramp in-between the boarding bridge and airplane to allow safe access and egress.

Despite ongoing maintenance efforts by Airport Staff since installation, the overall condition of the bridges after being exposed for years in the elements is taking a toll on the operational components. Many electrical components and boxes are rusted, wiring is dry rotted from U.V exposure, and the canopies are weathered.

In addition to the ongoing reliability and safety problems with the existing loading bridges, new bridges are justified due to the ongoing fleet mix changes occurring at ATW. ATW is seeing a drastic change in fleet mix with the airlines that use the airport on a daily basis. Many of the airlines have used smaller regional type aircraft in the past which the current bridges sill height can accommodate. (The sill height for the bridges at Gates 3, 4. 6 and 8 are 9’0”. The sill height for the bridge at Gate 5 is 13’9”). However, most airlines are making changes as they upgrade their fleets including:

  • Allegiant Air is replacing their MD-80 series aircraft with Airbus A-319/320 series (sill height of 11’1”) by the end of 2018.
  • Delta Air Lines is adding Bombardier CS-100 aircraft (sill height of 10’1”) by early 2019.
  • United Air Lines has introduced Embraer 175/190 series aircraft (sill height 9’11”).

With these new aircraft utilizing ATW, the current configuration of bridges that can accommodate the taller sill heights is limited and replacing the above named bridges to a taller version is imperative to ensure full utilization of the airport to the public.

Replacements of the bridges is essential for operational continuity and to ensure the traveling public is able to continue to use the airport in an efficient manner. In the past 12 months, there have been numerous times where the bridges have not been able to perform to their full capacity which has resulted in passengers unable to make connections or waiting for the bridge to be reset to offload. Additionally, given the problems are mainly electrical in nature, it is felt that the wiring is faulty and near the end of its useful life, which is a safety issue given the interconnection of all the systems.

The total cost of this project, to be funded 100% with PFCs, is estimated to be $6,887,000 as follows:

Gate
Total
Estimated
Cost
3
$1,470,000
4
1,320,000
5
1,320,000
6
1,217,000
8
1,560,000
Totals
$6,887,000

This project is estimated to start in November 2017 and be completed in December 2020.

Project 09-011 – Rehabilitation of Passenger Terminal Building Façade

This project includes the design and construction of the rehabilitation of the façade of the passenger terminal building. The rehabilitation will include the replacement of the exterior metal panels, siding and edge roof flashing as well as the required structural repairs to address water penetration. The project will include the replacement of the entry doors and vestibules. Exterior windows will be added and replaced in the ticket counter and baggage claim areas. The existing entry canopies, currently broken up into three separate areas will be connected and broadened to provide greater coverage to the passengers and will be evaluated for structural soundness.

The passenger terminal building was originally constructed in 1975 and has undergone multiple expansions (1981, 1985, 1989, 1999, 2000 and 2003). The multiple expansions have resulted in a building façade which requires significant upgrades to fix water penetration issues and provide a cohesive design consistent with the airport design standards. These issues are most apparent where previous expansion projects have met. The automatic doors and vestibules are over 20 years old and suffer from increasing maintenance problems. The expanded entry canopies, will provide greater coverage to arriving and departing passengers and will be evaluated for structural soundness given many years of salt damage from the public sidewalk near them. By adding and replacing windows, additional natural day lighting throughout the pre-secure area will be provided. By providing passengers a view of the terminal driveway from the interior of the building, additional public waiting space is created inside of the terminal building. Arriving passengers can wait inside the terminal building for arriving transportation. This will reduce congestion on the curb and will be particularly beneficial to passengers during the winter months by allowing them to wait inside the terminal building with better protection from the elements while waiting for transportation. Additionally, to meet the energy goals set forth by the airport in the FAA approved Sustainable Airport Master Plan, the windows will be replaced with high efficiency models and the overall building insulation will be increased with a metal panelized system to a high R-value system.

The total cost of this project is estimated to be $3,000,000. PFCs are anticipated to provide 100% funding for this project. This project is estimated to start in April 2019 and be completed in December 2019.

Project 09-012 – Rehabilitate Terminal Loop Road and Realign Airport Entrance

This project includes the design and construction necessary to rehabilitate the terminal building loop road and realign the airport entrance. The project includes three main elements. First is the rehabilitation of the loop road pavements. This will include selective full depth reconstruction of areas in both the HMA and PCC pavements which are failing. The remainder of the asphalt pavements will receive a mill and overlay. Certain sections of the roadways sidewalks, curbs and gutters will also be rehabilitated and new pavement markings will be placed. The second element includes the realignment of the airport entrance where the entrance road, exit road and loop road intersect. This will include the removal of the existing pavements and replacement with a roundabout. The roundabout will be constructed of asphalt. The project will include necessary earthwork, drainage, lighting, electrical services, erosion control, curbs and gutters. The final element of this project includes the replacement of the wayfinding signage along the loop road.

The concrete pavements immediately in front of the terminal building were constructed in 1997 and 1998. The asphalt loop road leading to and from the main terminal was constructed in 2007 as part of a major rehabilitation project to increase and improve traffic circulation for arriving and departing airport passengers. The total distance of the loop road is approximately 5,200’ with a one-way traffic concept entering off of College Ave and County CB intersection. The main lane closest to terminal (37’ in total width) consists of 3 separate lanes (one center drive and two lanes on the outside for pickup and drop-off of passengers) and is constructed of concrete (7” in total depth). The second drive lane which is the east lane (24’ in total width) consists of 3 separate lanes with the one lane used primarily for ground transportation services including taxi cabs and transportation network company for the pickup and drop-off of passengers. It is also constructed of concrete (7” in total depth). Both of these main lanes have seen considerable traffic over the past 10 years and are deteriorating with many of the panels showing loose material which is indicative of base failure in certain areas. There are also numerous cracks throughout the main drive lanes which are becoming more prevalent with usage. Many of these cracks and potholes also become hazards with the potential of a passenger tripping in a crack or pothole. The road areas outside of the main drive lanes consist of 3” of asphalt material over 12” of base course material. There are many areas that are showing signs of distress including cracking, spalling and potholes with two areas in particular on the south side which have sunk with base course failure with major dips that are affecting the control of vehicles as they make the corner departing the airport.

A Traffic Forecast Report conducted by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WIDOT) in June 2016 indicates that vehicles entering the Airport (measured at both the morning and afternoon design hours) is anticipated to increase almost 20% from 2015 to 2025 with a similar growth rate anticipated through 2035 and 2045. The reconfiguration of the Airport entrance to a roundabout will improve safety by slowing down traffic as it enters the Airport and approaches the terminal building. It will also improve the circulation and capacity of the Airport’s entrance and exit.

The guidance signs around the loop road of the terminal were installed as part of the terminal entrance reconstruction project in 2007. Since that time the signs have become faded and delaminated with many in need of replacement. Wayfinding signage which can be easily seen and understood by drivers using the airport roadways is important to prevent confusion and congestion on the roadway.

The total cost of this project is estimated to be $3,759,483. PFCs are anticipated to provide 100% funding for this project. The project is estimated to start in January 2020 and be completed in December 2020.

Project 09-013 – Collect Airport Data for Airports Geographic Information System

This project includes the preparation and submission of an eALP for the Airport in compliance with the FAA’s Airports Geographic Information System Database (AGIS) program. The survey project is governed by the following FAA Advisory Circulars, where required: AC 150/5300-16A General Guidance and Specifications for Aeronautical Surveys: Establishment of Geodetic Control and Submission to the National Geodetic Survey; AC 150/5300-17B General Guidance and Specifications for Aeronautical Survey Airport Imagery Acquisition and Submission to the National Geodetic Survey; and AC 150/5300-18B General Guidance and Specifications for Submission of Aeronautical Surveys to NGS: Field Data Collection and Geographic Information Systems Standards. The eALP will reflect the as-built condition of the airfield following the ALP update prepared in 2012, updated in 2015 and approved by the FAA on September 7, 2017. Additionally, this project includes an aerial survey of the Airport’s approach surfaces.

The Airports Surveying Geographic Information System (Airports GIS) helps the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) collect airport and aeronautical data to meet the demands of the Next Generation National Airspace System. The data will be used to develop satellite-based approach procedures and to better utilize and manage the National Airspace System. The Office of Airports is working on an initiative to create the Airport Layout Plan (ALP) assembly tools from the GIS data. This project contributes to aviation safety by providing current, comprehensive survey and obstruction data about the airport which is then populated in to the national database. Additionally, the Airport’s approach surfaces have not been flown since 1991 and a new review is necessary to ensure there are no new obstructions within the approach surfaces.

The total cost of this project is estimated to be $200,000. The State of Wisconsin is anticipated to provide funding in the amount of $160,000. PFCs are requested to provide the balance of $40,000. This project is estimated to start in April 2018 and be completed in December 2018.

Project 09-014 – Rehabilitate Runway Edge Lighting

This project includes the design and construction necessary to rehabilitate the runway edge lighting on both Runways 3/21 and 12/30. The project will include the replacement of the high intensity runway edge light fixtures, transformers, electrical wiring and a new regulator for Runway 3/21.

The runway edge lights on these runways were installed in 1989 and 1990. The Airport has experienced some inconsistency with lighting illumination and maintenance on these fixtures continues to increase. Given the age of the system, there is concern over the reliability of the runway edge lighting.

The total cost of this project is estimated to be $328,474. PFCs are anticipated to provide 100% funding for this project. This project is estimated to start in January 2020 and be completed in December 2020.

Project 09-015 – PFC Administration Fees

PFC-eligible general formation costs included in this PFC project are the necessary expenditures to prepare the new PFC application. This includes funds necessary to prepare, amend and close the application. Development associated with the approved projects in this application will preserve and enhance capacity and safety at the Airport. The total cost of this project is $75,000. PFCs are anticipated to provide 100% funding for this project. This project started in August 2017 and will be complete in July 2037.